RecycleSpot Blog

Melting myths about “wax-coated” food containers

If you’re like most recyclers, “wax-coated” paper food containers are a source of confusion for you. They’re obviously made of paper which you know is recyclable, but you’ve gotten mixed messages about their recyclability. Well, here’s the straight scoop: only one type is recyclable, and none are coated in wax.

The wax has waned

Most paper food containers that appear to be coated in wax are actually coated with polyethylene (PE) plastic. These containers are either made of fibers held together by a PE compound, or the container itself is lined with PE. The PE serves as a moisture and gas barrier. As a moisture barrier, it prevents transmission of liquids through the paper container. As a gas barrier, it prevents the absorption of gases in the air like oxygen and carbon dioxide, which can impact the freshness and quality of food products.

Types of containers

The most common types of PE-coated paper food containers you’re likely to come across are shown below. Cartons are the only type that are recyclable in your curbside bin or at your recycling center in the Kansas City metro area.

Cartons – These include milk, juice, soup, broth, and wine cartons, and drink boxes. These are 100 percent recyclable.

Hot drinking cups – These are the disposable coffee cups used by all coffee shops. The only recyclable components are the plastic lids and cardboard sleeves.

Fast food cups and containers – These are the containers in your average fast-food meal: soda cup, French fry holder, and sandwich box. (Only the plastic lid is recyclable. Straws are not.)

Tableware (plates, cups and bowls) – This is the classic disposable tableware often used at picnics and special events.

Take-out containers – These can be anything from the Chinese takeout container to the takeout box used by your favorite restaurant.

Frozen food containers – This covers everything from frozen entrees to ice cream tubs.

Why aren’t they recyclable?

Paper that is going to be recycled is shipped to a paper mill where it is mixed with water in a giant blender called a hydropulper. The hydropulper processes the paper into a slurry suitable for making recycled paper products. If the paper has a PE coating, it is impossible to recycle in the standard pulp process because the container will not break apart and blend in with the slurry during recycling.

So, the burning question you may be asking: why are PE-coated cartons recyclable, but all the others aren’t? Cartons have a different fiber composition, and the PE-coating type decomposes enough to break apart during the pulping process.

Convenience vs. durability

So what can you do to reduce the amount of PE-coated paper products in your home? It comes down to opting for durability over convenience:

For more information on recycling, visit RecycleSpot.org.