And the survey says…

Residents feel it’s important to recycle

Image of Blue curbside recycling bin. Text reads: "73% of residents are recycling more than they did in 2012"In October 2017, the MARC Solid Waste Management District contracted with ETC Institute to conduct a recycling survey of residents in the nine-county Kansas City metro area. The survey evaluated current recycling activities and knowledge to determine what recycling services residents would like to see in the future, and determine focus areas for expanded services and outreach priorities. The survey also looked at how citizens’ values, behavior and awareness levels have changed since the 2005, 2008 and 2012 surveys.

Curbside is king

When asked how much emphasis their household places on recycling, 82 percent of the residents surveyed indicated their household recycles most of the time, and 10 percent recycle all the time. This is due in large part to the increasing availability of curbside recycling in the metro area. More than 73 percent of residents reported they are recycling more compared to five years ago, specifically because curbside recycling is available.

The recycling activities that residents participated in most frequently — in addition to curbside recycling — were recycling plastic bags (65 percent) and recycling glass food and beverage containers (59 percent). The waste reduction activity that residents participated in most often was donating clothing and household items (94 percent).

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Satisfaction ratings

Respondents were most satisfied with services available for clothing and household item donation (81 percent), curbside recycling services (80 percent), materials accepted in curbside programs (63 percent), and yard waste collection and composting services (56 percent).

However, since the 2012 survey, satisfaction decreased in several areas including glass container recycling services. This is not surprising, given that, since 2009, the only widely available option for recycling glass in the metro area has been drop-off collection. Satisfaction has also decreased with the lower availability of drop-off recycling locations. Several communities (eight in the last two years) have closed their recycling centers and many schools and churches have closed their recycling drop-off bins to the public due to increased costs.

Government role

Most residents support public policies to improve recycling and waste reduction. Since the 2012 survey, residents also showed increased support for local government to:

  • Inform the public about existing programs/services (six percent increase).
  • Support waste reduction and recycling programs (four percent increase).
  • Educate on the importance of waste reduction/recycling (seven percent increase).
  • Develop policies to expand waste reduction/recycling (four percent increase).

However, many respondents are unwilling to pay for trash collection services based on the amount of trash set out for disposal (46 percent). In fact, since 2012, there was a significant decrease in the level of support for cities and counties implementing pay-as-you-throw programs (down 12 percent).

The road forward

The services residents would most like to see offered or expanded in their community are: glass container recycling, household hazardous waste collection, computer/electronic recycling, bulky-item pickup and expanded curbside collection service. More than half of those surveyed indicated that they would be willing to recycle food waste through curbside programs.

Residents indicated a decreased interest in receiving recycling information through city newsletters, the Kansas City Star or their local newspaper, and an increased interest in receiving it from an internet source that’s easy to find (53 percent) and utility bills (40 percent).

Finally, residents were asked if they had ever put something in a curbside recycling bin that they weren’t sure was recyclable — 53 percent indicated that they had. And 60 percent of residents reported they were recycling “everything possible.” Given the high contamination rates in curbside recycling and the fact that “everything possible” doesn’t account for all the additional recyclable items respondents are unaware of, the MARC Solid Waste Management District is going to double-down on helping residents not only to recycle more, but recycle better in 2018.

The full survey is available on the district’s website.

Congratulations to our 2018 SWMD grantees!

One of the most important things the MARC Solid Waste Management District (SWMD) does is provide financial support to organizations on the Missouri side of our region for projects that reduce the amount of material we send to landfills. The district receives funding every year from the fees collected from the landfills and transfer stations in Missouri. Half of that amount is used to fund local waste reduction, reuse and recycling projects through a grant program. So far this year, we have awarded more than $403,812 to 11 grantees.

The 2018 grant projects so far include:

Avenue of Life:  $32,500 to support the fifth year of a regional mattress recycling program.

Avila University:  $8,790 to purchase recycling containers and create signage for a campus-wide recycling program.

Bridging The Gap:  $84,674 to provide one-on-one consultations and assistance to businesses interested in starting new or expanding existing recycling and composting programs.

Franciscan Mission Warehouse: $30,400 to support staffing and purchase equipment to increase collection and distribution of used medical equipment.

Kansas City Zoo:  $24,991 to purchase recycling containers and create signage to support recycling at the zoo.

Meredith Used Car Sales & Recycling:  $14,925 to purchase of five, 30-yard containers for the collection of scrap metal in Cass County.

Missouri Recycling Association:  $30,000 to support costs for the annual recycling conference scheduled for September in Kansas City.

Platte City:  $5,686 to create educational materials and provide staffing to decrease the presence of non-recyclable material placed in curbside bins.

ScrapsKC:  $37,325 to support a staff position to increase material donations and to create an inventory database system for the creative reuse store.

Sleepyhead Beds:  $83,451 to purchase a truck and fund staff positions to increase the collection and distribution of mattresses.

Urban Lumber:  $51,070 to purchase a drying kiln and shelving for reclaiming urban trees for reuse.

We are very proud of our 2018 group of grant recipients and excited about their projects. The district could not accomplish its waste diversion goals without our grantees! Visit the Solid Waste Management District’s website to learn more about the grant program.

colorful plastic shopping bags on wooden background

Bring back your bags — and more!

Most plastic bags and wraps are made with materials that are recyclable. Unfortunately this doesn’t mean they can go in your curbside recycling bin. Why? Most facilities that manage curbside-collected recyclables use machines to separate rigid materials like cans, bottles or paper products. Due to their size and shape, plastic bags and wraps end up clogging the machinery. Employees must remove the plastic by hand, which is a time-consuming and potentially dangerous task.

So what can you do with them? They can still be recycled, they just require a different system. Many retail  and grocery stores offer free drop-off locations for  bags and films to be properly recycled. All you need to do is make sure the bags and wraps are clean and dry, and that you have removed any non-plastic items such as receipts and labels.

Let’s recap some of the “DOs” and “DON’Ts.”

Please DO recycle:

  • Grocery and retail bags. (Not in your curbside bin, but at a retail or grocery store with a collection bin. Don’t forget to remove the receipts!)
  • Newspaper, bread, produce and dry cleaning bags.
  • The outer wrapping from bulk beverages, napkins, paper towels, bathroom tissue and diapers.
  • Cereal and cracker box liners. (Unless they tear like paper.)
  • Bubble wrap and air pillows. (Pop the bubbles and deflate the pillows.)
  • Resealable storage bags. (Make sure they are clean, dry and don’t have any food residue.)
  • Poly mailers or plastic shipping envelopes. (Remove the shipping labels first.)
  • Document mailing/shipping envelopes such as FedEx Paks or Tyvek® envelopes. (Remove the shipping labels first).

Please DON’T recycle:

  • Plastic bags that tear like paper. (Recyclable bags have some stretch to them.)
  • Cellophane. (The plastic that makes a “crinkly” sound.)
  • Frozen food and pre-washed salad bags.
  • Food or cling wrap.
  • Candy wrappers. (You can recycle the bag that the candy came in.)
  • Snack bags, such as pretzels and potato chip bags.
  • Coffee pouches or other resealable food pouches, such as shredded cheese or trail mix.
  • Pet food bags.
  • Zippered packaging for bedding and garments.
  • Biodegradable or compostable bags.

If you come across a bag or film that is not listed above, a simple test will determine whether it is accepted for recycling or not. If you give the bag or wrap a slight tug and it stretches, it is likely recyclable. If it rips or tears similar to paper, it is likely not. When in doubt, don’t include bags or films you are unsure of — toss them into the trash.

Plastic bags and wraps can be recycled into many useful products, such as low-maintenance fencing and decking, building and construction materials and of course, new bags.

So remember, take your bags and wraps back on your next trip to the store!

For more information about plastic bag recycling, visit PlasticFilmRecycling.org.

Reducing waste through creative reuse

It’s a craft store — a design center — a make-and-take space. It’s a treasure. It’s ScrapsKC! Welcome to Kansas City’s newest and only creative reuse center.

You are probably familiar with the concept of reduce, reuse and recycle. Following that order, reuse is the second-highest and best use of materials — better than recycling. After experiencing ScrapsKC, you may become hooked on the reuse concept.

ScrapsKC, an SWMD 2017 grantee, is located in an older brick building in the west bottoms of Kansas City. Climb the wooden steps inside, labeled with words such as “crafts” and “birthday parties”, and enter the store — you will be greeted by an array of things any child, artist or teacher could dream of. ScrapsKC is a well-organized shop filled with a multitude of colorful craft items, art supplies, paper, fabrics and useful materials, all available at a dramatically reduced cost. A walk around the store and your creative powers will start to explode!

ScrapsKCcollage: photos of interior of retail space.

All of the material in the store is donated and was otherwise destined for the landfill. Businesses, manufacturers, schools and community members donate items that are useful to artists, teachers, makers, scouts, Do-It-Yourselfers and other creative people. In just one year, ScrapsKC has diverted over 25 tons of materials from the landfill.

In addition to the retail store, ScrapsKC features a “Make & Take” space, a Design Center, space for field trips and birthday parties, and plenty of volunteer opportunities.

ScrapsKC also provides opportunities for the homeless to volunteer in the retail store. In exchange for their work, homeless volunteers receive a homemade meal and survival items to help them get through another day. ScrapsKC hopes to grow its resources and support network to employ these homeless volunteers as paid workers.

A visit to ScrapsKC is a win-win: for your pocketbook and for the environment.

The store is located at 1324 W. 12th Street, Kansas City, MO 64101. Learn more at: www.scrapskc.org.

 

Yes We Can! 2017

The MARC Solid Waste Management District held its 2017 Annual Meeting and Awards Luncheon on Wednesday, Dec. 6, at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center. Jason Morado from ETC Institute spoke about the results of the district’s recent residential recycling survey. The survey explored resident’s thoughts, attitudes and behaviors with regard to recycling. The survey also examines changes since the last survey in 2012.

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From left, Joan Leavens for Shawnee Mission School District; Rob Fort, KC Water;  Patti Rine and Mike Scruby for American Legion Post #61;  John Blessing for Waste Management.

The district also recognized several individuals and organizations that have made notable contributions to regional waste management and recycling efforts. See photos from the event on Flickr » The 2017 Special Recognition Award recipients include:

Public Employee — Rob Fort, City of Kansas City, Missouri Department of Water Services

The Public Employee award recognizes a public employee who has shown dedication to the development and advancement of waste reduction and recycling through individual achievement and commitment.

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TESA awardee P.J. Born with Joan Leavens (right) and Matt Riggs (left).

Outstanding Program — Shawnee Mission School District & Board of Education

The Outstanding Program award recognizes an innovative or outstanding waste reduction or recycling program. Joan Leavens, Sustainability and Community Engagement Coordinator, accepted this award.

Waste Industry — Waste Management of Kansas, Inc.

The Waste Industry award recognizes outstanding waste reduction and recycling efforts for a business in the waste industry. John Blessing, Public Sector Manager, accepted this award.

Every Little Bit Counts — The American Legion Post #61

The “Every Little Bit Counts” award recognizes that small actions are meaningful. Mike Scruby accepted the award.

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TESA awardee Muriel Desbleds-Wilson with Kate Delehunt (right) and Matt Riggs (left).

Teaching Environmental Stewardship Award

The Kansas City Environmental Education Network also recognized two teachers who provide outstanding environmental education in the Kansas City metro:

  • P.J. Born, Shawnee Mission South High School
  • Muriel Desbleds-Wilson, Académie Lafayette

Learn more about their accomplishments »

Image of full curbside recycling bin on a curb, with Recycle More Recycle Better logo. Text reads: "recycle more, recycle better".

To bin, or not to bin? Now, there’s no question!

At times, you may find yourself confused about what you can and cannot put in your curbside recycling bin. Why? It’s possible that the information you’ve been given is outdated, hearsay, or just flat wrong. The Recycle More, Recycle Better guide solves this problem by listing the most up-to-date information on what can and can’t go in your curbside recycling bin.

 

Recycle More, Recycle Better flier. Pictures materials that can be recycled curbside or drop-off, and materials that can be recycled through other means, and that cannot be recycled in our area (Greater Kansas City).

The buck stops at the MRFs

We collaborated with the Material Recovery Facilities (MRFs) to develop this guide. MRFs are the facilities where all your recyclables are taken to be sorted, baled and shipped off to be made into new products. The buck stops at the MRFs because they have the final say in what is and is not acceptable in all Kansas City metro area curbside and drop-off recycling programs.

That’s recyclable?

While the flier lists items most people know are recyclable such as cans, paper and plastic bottles, it also identifies some recyclable items that may surprise you:

  • Aerosol cans — Wasp spray, whipped cream, spray paint, or sunscreen— if it’s a metal spray can, it can be recycled. However, it must be empty and no longer make a “hiss” sound when the trigger is depressed.
  • Aluminum foil and pans — As long as they’re rinsed off, they’re recyclable. Scrunch foil into a ball shape to prevent it from accidentally mixing in with paper.
  • Paper cartons — Milk, soup, broth, juice boxes and wine cartons are all recyclable, even if they have a plastic lid. Rinse carton and put lid back on before recycling.
  • Planting pots and trays — As long as they’re rinsed off, they’re recyclable.

That’s not recyclable?

Unfortunately a lot of what you thought could go in your bin, should not. When items that can’t be recycled are mixed in with recyclable items, the result is what the recycling industry calls “contamination.” Some non-recyclables can contaminate an entire truckload of materials by lowering their value, if not negating it entirely. Less contamination means less waste sent to the landfill, and it can also mean less downtime for sorting equipment that can easily be broken by materials it was not meant to handle.

Here are the top offenders that should not go in your curbside bin:

  • Plastic bags and film — They clog up equipment and cause shutdowns at the recycling facility. These can be recycled at your local grocery or “big box” store. For a complete list of plastics that can and cannot be recycled in the metro area, including bags and film, visit our Plastics Recycling page.
  • Paper food containers and tableware — Whether its paper plates and cups (including paper coffee cups), or fast food, takeout and frozen food containers, they should not go in the bin. All of these items have a thin plastic coating that can’t be separated from the cardboard. This coating makes them neither recyclable nor compostable. For more information about paper food containers and tableware, check out our blog post on the subject.
  • Styrofoam — No type of Styrofoam product should go in your curbside bin. Foam has very low economic value. It also has a tendency to disintegrate into smaller pieces during transport that cling to other recyclables.
  • Pizza boxes — The clean top is recyclable. The greasy, food-covered bottom is not. However, you can compost the bottom if you have a compost bin.
  • “Tanglers” — This is an industry term for long, stringy items such as VHS tapes, shower curtains, extension cords, and garden hoses. Like plastic bags and film, tanglers clog up equipment and cause shutdowns at the recycling facility.

Over the next year, the MARC Solid Waste Management District, will be promoting this flier to area haulers, cities, and homeowners associations. In the meantime, download it and share with your friends, family, co-workers and neighbors who live in the Kansas City metro area. It is available for download in both 11 x 17 and 8.5 x 11 sizes.

For more information on recycling, visit RecycleSpot.org.

 

Recycling Jewelry to Benefit Kansas City Hospice House

by Kathleen Corbin, Top Drawer

Buying used from a resale boutique is a great way to live a more sustainable lifestyle and help a local charity at the same time.

Kansas City Hospice and Palliative Care operates a quality, up-scale boutique that sells jewelry, clothing and home décor. All of the proceeds from store sales support Kansas City Hospice and The Hospice House. Our store, Top Drawer, is located at 9433 Mission Road, Leawood, KS 66206.

We started a jewelry recycling program a couple of years ago. You can donate all your old jewelry to Top Drawer, even if it is not in tip-top shape. We resell all of the pieces that are in good condition, repair the broken ones, and take apart the rest, saving the components to make new jewelry. Nothing in our program is wasted. Broken brooches can become new pendants or collage necklaces, and beads can be reused in new necklaces or bracelets.

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A new piece of jewelry that was made from broken earrings, broken brooches and miscellaneous beads that came off of broken necklaces.

Here is a link to our You Tube Video, which explains a lot about our jewelry project. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBM7MWLfSxw

We would love to have your jewelry, gently-worn clothing, shoes and home accessories! Your donations assist Kansas City Hospice in providing expert care, peace of mind, comfort, guidance and hope to the people of our community.