Congratulations to our 2016 SWMD grantees!

Photos of past grantee projects, and/or district grant priority target materials. From top to bottom: Man deconstructing a mattress, receptacles for recycling and trash, used books, woman collecting food waste, bicycles.One of the most important things the MARC Solid Waste Management District (SWMD) does is provide financial support to organizations in our region for projects that reduce the amount of material we send to landfills. The district receives funding every year from the fees collected from the state’s landfills and transfer stations. Half of that amount is used to fund local waste reduction, reuse and recycling projects through a grant program. So far this year, we have awarded more than $515,000 to eight grantees. Another $70,000 in grant funding is in the final stages of being awarded.

The 2016 grant projects so far include:

  • Access Records Management: $50,000 to provide recycling services to businesses.
  • Avenue of Life: $51,140 to support the third year of a regional mattress recycling program.
  • Bridging The Gap: $80,000 to provide one-on-one consultations and assistance to businesses interested in starting new or expanding existing recycling and composting programs.
  • Dr. Joseph Martinich: $12,984 to produce a study on the economics of recycling for the Kansas City region.
  • Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences: $9,000 to improve the campus recycling program.
  • MRC Recycling: $5,000 for a baler to manage plastic material.
  • Missouri Organic: $206,233 to support infrastructure development for the placement of a food depackaging system (equipment that separates food items from their packaging material, including plastic and cans).
  • Project Central: $101,143 to support the second year of consultations for school composting and/or recycling programs.

We are very proud of our 2016 group of grant recipients and excited about their projects. The district could not accomplish its waste diversion goals without our grantees! Visit the Solid Waste Management District’s website to learn more about the grant program.

Congratulations to our 2015 SWMD grantees!

One of the most important things the MARC Solid Waste Management District (SWMD) does is provide financial support to organizations in our region for projects that reduce the amount of material we send to landfills. The district receives funding every year from the fees collected from the state’s landfills and transfer stations. Half of that amount is used to fund local waste reduction, reuse and recycling projects through a grant program.

We are very proud of our 2015 group of grant recipients and excited about their projects. The district could not accomplish its waste diversion goals without our grantees!

The 2015 grant projects are:

  • Avenue of Life: $203,492 to support the second year of a regional mattress recycling program.
  • Bridging The Gap: $79,740 to provide one-on-one consultations and assistance to businesses interested in starting new or expanding existing recycling programs.
  • City of Kearney: $5,700 to purchase a container to collect electronics at the Kearney Drop-off Recycling Center.
  • Kansas City Design Center: $30,000 to design a comprehensive, appealing and convenient recycling system for downtown Kansas City.
  • Meredith Car Sales & Recycling: $19,916 to purchase a trailer and hold at least 10 electronic recycling collection events in Cass County.
  • Missouri Organic: $4,000 to purchase carts and establish a paper towel composting program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City campus.
  • Missouri Recycling Association: $12,000 to support costs for a keynote speaker and AV equipment at the annual recycling conference scheduled for September in Kansas City.
  • Project Central: $47,044 to work with five schools to set up recycling and/or composting programs.
  • Southeast Enterprises: $12,000 to support transportation costs associated with a regional holiday light recycling program.
  • Sleepyhead Beds: $7,000 for staffing to conduct six mattress collection events and six presentations in the region north of the Missouri River. Sleepyhead Beds holds these events to collect quality used mattresses which are sanitized and provided to children in need.
  • The Rehabilitation Institute: $80,000 to collect and divert durable medical equipment from the waste stream. Equipment is then either repaired and made available for reuse, or recycled.
  • Truman Heritage Habitat for Humanity ReStore: $49,434 to provide a truck and staffing at the Lee’s Summit Resource Recovery Park to capture reusable materials before they enter the landfill.

Visit the Solid Waste Management District’s website to learn more about the grant program.

Sleepyhead Beds: helping children in need and keeping mattresses out of landfills

sleepyhead beds vanThe MARC Solid Waste Management District administers an annual grant program that awards funds to local communities and organizations for waste reduction and recycling-related projects. From time to time, we publish updates about recent grant recipients.

Most of us will likely have a few mattresses throughout our lifetimes. What did you do with your last mattress after you bought a new one? Instead of throwing out an old mattress, you can do something good for kids in the Kansas City region and for the environment.

If your old mattress is still in reasonable shape, with no noticeable stains or structural problems, you can donate it to Sleepyhead Beds. Sleepyhead Beds is a local organization that takes gently used, unwanted mattresses and sanitizes and sterilizes them for redistribution to children in need. The organization also accepts donations of clean, gently used sheets, comforters and pillow cases.

In 2013, Sleepyhead Beds received a grant from the MARC Solid Waste Management District to purchase a truck and hire a driver to expand its program for collecting and redistributing beds and bedding. This helped Sleepyhead Beds redistribute more than 1,600 mattresses and 1,200 pounds of bedding. If you lined up those mattresses end to end, they would stretch over two miles!

Reusing mattresses also saves a lot of time and energy since recycling them can be very difficult. Plus, any mattress that ends up in a landfill takes up a lot of space. If the 1,600 mattresses redistributed by Sleepyhead Beds were all twin-sized they would take up 27,000 cubic feet, or enough space to cover a basketball court eight times. (That would make it much easier to dunk!)

To learn more or to arrange a donation, visit Sleepyhead Bed’s website.

A bright idea for Southeast Enterprises

The MARC Solid Waste Management District administers an annual grant program that awards funds to local communities and organizations for waste reduction and recycling-related projects. From time to time, we publish updates about recent grant recipients.

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Old strands of holiday lights may not work, but they’re far from worthless. For the second year, Southeast Enterprises will collect unusable or unwanted holiday lights for recycling. Last year, they exceeded their goal of recycling 24,000 pounds of holiday lights. This year’s goal is to exceed 34,000 pounds.

So, what happens to all of those lights? Once collected, Southeast’s employees prepare the lights for recycling by clipping and sorting each component of the light strands: wires, plugs, light receptacles and bulbs. The components are then sent to other organizations for recycling or energy recovery. Every part of the light string is recycled.

snowman trashcanThe program does more than help the environment — it provides jobs, too. To disassemble the lights Southeast Enterprises employs more than 160 Jackson County residents who are intellectually and developmentally disabled.

Collection containers will be placed at more than 165 participating schools, businesses, recycling centers and community organizations. View the map of drop-off locations to find one near you.  They will collect lights until Jan. 26, 2014.

The district is pleased to be part of this effort by providing grant support to Southeast’s 2012-13 and 2013-14 collection programs.

Students get a close look at recycling

The MARC Solid Waste Management District administers an annual grant program and awards funds to local communities and organizations for waste reduction and recycling-related projects. From time to time, we publish updates about recent grant recipients.

Recycling center field trip
Students from Harrisonville Elementary check out bales of plastic at the Town and Country recycling center.

An enthusiastic group of third grade students from Harrisonville Elementary School recently participated in a field trip at the Town & Country Disposal recycling center. The students got to see how cardboard, plastic, aluminum cans and paper are separated after they’re collected and baled before being shipped off to be made into new products. According to their teacher, April Schoenberg, “Several of the kids mentioned that they would love to have a job at the recycling center and work there when they grow up!”

The tour of the recycling center was made possible by a grant from the MARC Solid Waste Management District to the Cass County Sustainability Committee (CCSC). The CCSC is a grassroots group formed in late 2007 to address recycling and promote sustainability to residents. Funding provided by the District is currently used by the CCSC to transport third and fourth grade students from participating schools throughout Cass County to the Town & Country Disposal recycling facility. In addition to the field trips, the District has funded seven additional permanent recycling locations in Cass County, a redesign of the CCSC’s website, distribution of education materials to schools and the community, advertising in movie theaters and through radio spots, and new social media efforts to draw the community to the recycling program.

More information about recycling in Cass County is available on the CCSC website.